Vital Info

This list of frequently asked questions and advice has been gained over many years of breeding Frenchies.  It is by no means a definitive list but a really good companion to assist you in getting the most out of your Perreux Frenchie.

We have spent over a decade striving to breed top quality French Bulldogs, through vigorous health testing and choosing the best and healthiest genetics.  A lot of special love and care has been lavished on your puppy to ensure they have the best possible start in life.  As with all living things, accidents or illness can beset any of us.  Should anything happen to your puppy we encourage you to contact us at any time to help – whether it be just advice and guidance or a more serious issue that might need a referral to specialist care like pathology, surgery or even chiropractic treatment.   And our commitment to you and your Frenchie’s continued health and happiness extends to the whole life of your dog.

(Bouledogue Francais / Frenchie / FrogDog)

French Bulldogs are a brachycephalic breed which takes its name from Greek roots meaning “short” and “head”.  They have a short and compact physique with a screw tail.

Frenchies can choke easily.  They have a small throat cavity and will choke on many things.  Bones of all types should be avoided – even chicken necks can be dangerous. You should also be very careful of rawhide chews as they can become soggy are a serious choke hazard.  For help with teething you can give your Puppy Pedigree Dentastix or Greenies Dog Treats.

Frenchies die from overheating.  Their bulk and breathing system makes it difficult for them to regulate their temperature efficiently and they do not cool like most dogs.  They also do not recognise they are in heat stress and can keep running until the situation becomes lethal.  So they rely on you to recognise their distress and take care of them especially in hotter months. Ensure they have plenty of shade and cool water.  Don’t walk them too far if it’s hot and if they display problems carry them. They often love to chew ice which can assist on hot days.  And they definitely should not be left in a car.

If your dog becomes heat stressed immediately get it under cold running water to bring its temperature down.

Frenchies Drown.  Their bulk and musculature make them top heavy and they will drown in a dam or swimming pool. They may love water but they should never be left near water without constant supervision. If they love water give them a clam pool.  Our Sara loved water – here is what we reckon is safe when it comes to Frenchies and water:

Frenchie eyes are susceptible to puncture and cuts.  Their faces are so endearing because of their pronounced eyes but care should be taken not to have spikey or sharp objects at their eye level.

They think they can fly – so don’t leave your puppy unattended on anything high.  The truth is they can’t. As a general rule if they can jump up on an object (like a lounge) they are probably pretty close to being safe to jump back down – but it’s always good to be cautious and help them down for a while even if they seem confident.

Not one Frenchie in history has ever been recorded as dying from an overdose of cuddles.

The transition period from mother and kennel to a new home is probably the most dramatic change your dog will ever go through. The puppy will be counting on you to provide security, love and affection.  They are going to miss their brothers, sisters, aunts, uncles and mum for a few days.

The first day in a new place will be most exciting for your puppy. They will experience new smells, a car ride, new people and strange places. Collect your puppy early in the day so they have time to ‘suss out’ their new home before going to bed by themselves.

They will probably take a few days to settle down at night as the puppy is sure to cry, howl or bark when left alone. Do not shout or smack them, and do not give in either. If you go to the puppy once during the night, he will howl again every time you leave him. A toy to cuddle up with, a hot water bottle, a ticking clock or even the radio left on low may well be appreciated and help the puppy settle. It is probably best to turn the lights off as we have trained them that darkness means sleep in our kennel environment.

The puppy will benefit from having their own secure quiet area where they can feel safe if worried or scared.  Fill it with things that make them feel comfortable – nice bedding, toys, food and water.  A will help your puppy settle.

Their first nights will be scary and they may cry when alone, but they will settle down to sleep when put in their area – especially if they feel safe.

Your puppy’s diet at this stage of life is VERY important. Frenchies grow and develop (hips, joins, immune systems) up until they are 18-24 months of age so a healthy balanced diet is very important.  At present we are feeding your puppy the following:

  • As much Royal Canin Junior as they want (around ¾ the size of its head)
  • Human grade minced meat – Beef, Chicken or Lamb
  • Protexin (Probiotic)
  • Nutrapet (a Multivitamin)

Maintain a regular diet and feed your Pup 2 to 3 times daily until they are around 8 months old.  Try not to change their diet but if you do only ever change it gradually otherwise you risk upsetting their tummy.

Initially your puppy will be under stress moving into its new home and leaving their mates.  Some Protexin might assist in settling any stress tummy but be especially careful with their diet while they settle in.

NEVER GIVE PORK OR PORK PRODUCTS INCLUDING SAUSAGES, BACON OR ANY OTHER FOOD CONTAINING PIG.  This is because it upsets a dog’s stomach and causes severe diarrhoea.

Breakfast/Dinner

Puppies should be fed more often than adults.  We advise that you give your little one Breakfast and Dinner. It should consist of:

  • ⅓ to ½ Cup of Royal Canin Junior
  • Hi fat content human grade minced beef, chicken or lamb mixed through the dry food well

It is vital for your puppy to eat their dry food – it is a balanced food that optimises their nutrition and provides all the requirements they need to grow.  They will test you by trying to weed out the wet food – but never just feed them mince meat – it will fill them but won’t allow them to reach their potential.

Frenchies can be funny with their food, puppies often like a low rimmed bowl and get spooked if it moves – so putting it on a rubber mat can help.  The experience of eating should be entirely stress free.  Things like being careful not to feed them in one room and move to another to do something exciting while they are eating as they might think they are missing out and stop eating to be with you.

Alternative Feeding

For variety you can introduce Sardines or Tuna in spring water and an egg once a week.  They can also be encouraged by a small sprinkling of cheese (who doesn’t love cheese!).

Your puppy has had its initial vaccinations and all the follow up dates are listed on the vaccination certificate provided by Dr Rob Zammit at Vineyard Veterinary Hospital.  It contains certification of all your puppy’s vaccinations.  It is an important document and should always be taken with you when you go to the Vet. It will help them work out what is needed and prove immunity.  It is also important should you need to board your Frenchie or travel with them.

Puppies get worms.  They come through the soil, fleas and on many of the surfaces that they love to lick and sticks they like to chew.  There is no way to stop worms so they should be treated regularly.

Your puppy has been wormed monthly during its stay with us.  We have provided the next due date on your “Puppy Health Checklist”.  We have given them Drontal Puppy Liquid which is very effective.  Treatments available in the Supermarket are not entirely effective and should be avoided.

We have provided a separate sheet with where to buy effective and cheap online pet supplies – using these suppliers will be most effective both in cost and efficacy.

Heartworm kills dogs.  Heartworm is spread by mosquitoes and other biting insects.  It is vital to protect your Puppy from them and there are a number of simple treatments.  They include monthly and yearly formats.  We normally treat our Frenchies on the 1st of the month and this is a good prompt to ensure that all the relevant treatments are remembered which leads us to fleas:

No one wants fleas, they cause disease and make your puppy generally uncomfortable.  Frenchies have problems getting to parts of their bodies so fleas can literally drive them crazy.  In our experience the best prevention on the market is Advantage and if you use the 1st of the month rule then it’s easy to remember to do fleas and heartworm at the same time.

All puppies have weak bladders and need to go to the toilet frequently. It is a good idea to take the puppy out every hour or so initially, but always immediately upon waking, after playing, after feeding, and before going to bed at night.

Take him to the same spot each time and praise him for a ‘job well done’! When inside have plenty of newspaper near his bed or in the room in which the puppy will be sleeping. Do not scold the puppy if he has an accident. Most puppies will not soil their bed and are usually quick to learn that outside is the correct place to go. After a few weeks most puppies will be house-trained.

In the first few weeks, you must give the puppy your constant attention. You can teach him some basic commands, like ‘sit’ and ‘come’ or play ball to teach him to ‘fetch’. Always be patient with the puppy, give him plenty of reassurance, praise and cuddles.

Your furrowed friend is a pretty low maintenance dog when it comes to their grooming.  They do however have some special grooming needs that our delightful breed requires to stay happy and healthy. While your Frenchie has a short coat that generally needs minimal care, when it comes to the folds around the face, the Frenchie’s beauty is more than just skin deep. There are health issues that can arise if the wrinkles in your Frenchie’s face are not properly and routinely cleansed.

The furrows can collect dirt and oils from the dog’s skin and require a clean out daily if possible but definitely weekly.  If left too long the residual can cause an infection. Baby wipes are the best invention for this.

They should also be bathed about once a month which is good frequency to keep them clean but not dry out their coat too much.  Selsun Gold was actually initially formulated for dogs – but we humans liked it so much we claimed it.  It is the best shampoo for your Frenchie as it aids in coat care and any itchiness from a dry coat.

Their signature gorgeous Bat Ears should also be cleaned with a standard ear solution that you can get from Pet Barn – follow the instructions on the label.

Their nose can get dry and the best way of keeping it moist is Lucas’ Papaw Ointment.

Nails should be kept short as they can interfere with the way the paw holds the body up.  Regular walks on a hard surface will help but the dew claws will have to be clipped as required.

They will benefit (and love) a regular brush especially when they lose their summer and winter coats.

We are also available to board your Frenchie either in an emergency or while you on holiday (capacity dependant).  If we are unable to help we can refer you to a kennel who understands the needs of French Bulldogs.

Perreux Frenchies are always our babies and their welfare is our paramount concern. Should you – for any reason – need (or want) to surrender your Perreux Frenchie at any stage in their life please inform us FIRST.  We are happy to take over or assist in managing its health and rehoming.  We continue to be committed to their love and care throughout their lives.

ITEMS MENTIONED ON THIS PAGE

All items listed on this page are described in detail on our Tried and Tested page where you can find links to the products themselves and places to buy them cheaper online.

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